Research


Over my Human Factors (HF) graduate years, I have had the fortunate opportunities to be exposed and involved in a diverse number of research projects concerning the HF discipline, and thus, I have came to develop a great interest in a multitude of research areas in Human Factors. Nevertheless, my current research focus is in video games. Specifically, I am interested in researching the different aspects in video games that influence people’s perception whether a video game is a “good” versus “bad” game. With that said, I am still interested and welcomed any new research opportunities that can help me broaden my horizon about the HF field.

Below is a list of the some of my past and current research projects:

  • Gender Differences in First Impressions of Web Pages: Current study examines whether there are gender differences between the way males and females first viewed different e-commerce Web pages through the usage of a survey and an eye tracking technique.
  • Gender Differences in Video Games Usage and Preference: Current study examines if there are any differences in terms of video game usage, habit, and preference among male gamers versus female gamers.
  • Current Video Game Usage Patterns: Conducted an independent study examining the video game usage, preference, and behavior of different groups of gamers (e.g., experts and novices, console and computer).
  • General Games Usage on Facebook: Conducted an independent study exploring the general usage, preference, and spending habit of people who play social games (e.g., Farmville, Empire & Allies) on Facebook.
  • Video Games and Their Effects on Visual and Cognitive Skills: Conducted an independent study investigating whether the frequency of video games playing and playing certain game genres (e.g., Action, Strategy) have different influences on gamers’ visual and cognitive abilities.
  • Improving Older Adults’ Contrast Sensitivity: Conducted an independent study examining whether older adults’ contrast sensitivity can be improved through perceptual learning, and if learning occurred can it be generalized to different tasks.
  • Driving & Aging: Worked in a four-member team supervised by Dr. Rui Ni to study the older driver population. Research goals were: 1) Determine the performance of older adults in driving-related tasks (e.g., steering control, collision detection, and lane changing), 2) Explore the different visual functions (e.g., contrast sensitivity, useful field of view) and their relation to older drivers’ driving performance, 3) Examine ways to improve older adults’ vision and driving abilities. This research is funded by the Regional Institute on Aging and the Gridley Hoover Pilot Research Program.
  • Website Accessibility: Conducted an independent research project investigating website accessibility among the disabled population. Specifically, this study had two phases: 1) Assessing the general Internet usage of disabled people and the general views that they have about government (.gov), education (.edu), and other websites (.com, .net, etc.), and 2) Examining performance and preference of people with learning and/or cognitive disabilities on two travel websites.

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